Tag: campaign to eliminate drunk driving

Happy St. Patrick’s Day

There were 276 drunk driving fatalities on St. Patrick’s Day from 2009-2013, making it one of the deadliest holidays on the road for drunk driving. – MADD.org

It’s Friday night and it’s St. Patrick’s Day. This combination makes me worry. Although I wish that you have a great time with your celebrations – I MUST take this time to simply remind you to not to depend on luck if your planning on drinking and driving. Your choices impact everyone around you. Have fun but please don’t drink and drive. Be sure to designated non-drinking driver.  

If your hosting your own St. Patrick’s Day party? Here are some safe party tips from MADD.org:

  • As guests RSVP, confirm that they have a plan for a safe way home via a non-drinking designated driver (rideshare service, public transportation, taxi, etc.).
  • Offer non-alcoholic beverages or mocktails for non-drinking designated drivers and others who prefer not to drink alcohol. Create a fun green mocktail to celebrate St. Patrick’s Day!
  • If, despite your efforts, some of your guests have had too much to drink, never let them drive home impaired.

More safe partytips can be found at madd.org/safeparty

Pledge to be Safe this St. Patrick’s Day

Pledge to be a designated driver, or pledge to drive drug and alcohol-free this St. Patrick’s Day. You could save your friends’ lives, or your own.

 

MichaelI will love you forever Michael, until we meet again.

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When You Drink & Drive, Luck is Not on Your Side

I can’t let a St. Patrick’s Day go by without reminding everyone how your choices can have a life long impact on others. Please, I encourage you to have some fun with your family and friends BUT above all else, be responsible – be sure to have a designated non-drinking driver.  


There were 276 drunk driving fatalities on St. Patrick’s Day from 2009-2013, making it one of the deadliest holidays on the road for drunk driving. – MADD.org

Hosting your own St. Patrick’s Day party? Here are some safe party tips from MADD.org:

  • As guests RSVP, confirm that they have a plan for a safe way home via a non-drinking designated driver (rideshare service, public transportation, taxi, etc.).
  • Offer non-alcoholic beverages or mocktails for non-drinking designated drivers and others who prefer not to drink alcohol. Create a fun green mocktail to celebrate St. Patrick’s Day!
  • If, despite your efforts, some of your guests have had too much to drink, never let them drive home impaired.

More safe partytips can be found at madd.org/safeparty

Pledge to be Safe this St. Patrick’s Day

Pledge to be a designated driver, or pledge to drive drug and alcohol-free this St. Patrick’s Day. You could save your friends’ lives, or your own.

 

MichaelI will love you forever Michael, until we meet again.

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A Rush of Emotions

Birthday’s and Anniversary’s are always hard. Contrary to the popular saying, I know first hand that “Time does NOT heal all wounds”. It’s hard for people who have never lost a son or daughter to understand the tremendous grief that resides within you.
     Time teaches you to walk with your grief. It’s hard for the people around you to understand and my hope is that they would never understand, for that would mean they are suffering the same pain.  
     Today is my handsome Son’s birthday. I remember all the wonderful, funny and silly things he did. The sound of his guitar ringing through the house, his slicked back hair and 501 jeans. I love you and miss you everyday may you play your guitar with the angels, until we meet again my son. 
Michael
 Originally posted in  MADD.org.blog, September 11, 2014

As with any tragedy, there comes a time to observe the traumatic event’s anniversary. Many people believe that grief will wane with time. However, feelings of anger, guilt, isolation, loneliness, sadness and despair often occur long after the disaster. 

On the anniversary of the September 11th disaster, many people find themselves once again contemplating the event and its tragic consequences.

Life threatening trauma, including learning that a loved one has been seriously injured or killed, can provoke unsettling emotional or behavioral reactions over a long period of time.

We always say: First there’s the crash, then the lifelong impact.

For many victims the anniversary of a tragic event, no matter how many years have gone by, may make the loss more real and bring out a rush of emotions.  Often the pain increases and becomes more intense following the first anniversary.  This is a normal reaction. Grief is a journey and everyone grieves in their own way.

hands-support-2Here are a few tips to keep in mind for an anniversary of a tragic event:

  • Talk.  Unspeakable trauma becomes more manageable when it’s verbalized. Individuals who were personally affected by a tragedy, but have not talked to anyone should seek support. Those who were not personally affected but are experiencing some hypersensitivity, should also talk to someone who understands trauma.
  • Honor individual differences in trauma reaction. Your way is not the only way. Respect the different ways in which people continue to cope. People cope the best way they can.
  • Reach out and remember those more directly affected. Many people who are grieving feel that friends, family, and their community have “forgotten” about them. This can lead to increased feelings of isolation and loneliness. Reach out and listen to their stories. Although they may say the same things over and over, honor these experiences by listening rather than giving advice or telling them that “time heals all wounds.”
  • Do something to help. Recognize the possible reactions to the anniversary. Remember that those directly affected may not be the only ones to experience anniversary reactions. Emphasize that people can be helped by small deeds.  Plant a tree or perennial plant in memory of a loved one who died or in honor of someone who was injured.
  • Seek professional support.  Recognize that grieving is normal, but encourage people to seek professional support when they need it.

If you are struggling with grief, call 877.MADD.HELP to speak with a victim advocate, day or night.

– See more at: http://www.madd.org/blog/2014/september/anniversary.html#sthash.Eps0WI9n.dpuf

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Tips to Protect Children from Drunk Driving

Children are our greatest resource and our future. That’s why MADD is taking action to help protect the children who are needlessly put in danger every day in this country.

While drunk driving is recognized as a violent crime, driving impaired with child passengers is not commonly acknowledged as a form of child endangerment or child abuse. No one should have to ride with an impaired driver. However, children have little choice when the driver is a parent or an adult caregiver.

kidincarIf you see an adult who is visibly impaired attempting to drive with a child in the car:

  • Calmly suggest alternative transportation, recommend the driver postpone travel or offer to drive the child, if appropriate. Avoid a heated altercation that can put the child in further danger.
  • Call 911 at the time of the incident with as much information as possible (such as name of the driver, vehicle description and/or license plate, and destination). Also be sure to give them your name and contact information for responding officers.
  • Document the situation so that your notes can be used later.
  • Notify another parent or caregiver of the situation.
  • Teach children techniques for keeping themselves safe if they are ever forced to ride with an impaired driver (see below).
  • Report your concerns to state or local child protective agencies.

Here are some tips you can teach your kids or a child you know who might find themselves in a situation where they are riding with a drinking driver:

  • Sit in the back seat.
  • Buckle-up tight and use your booster seat, if needed.
  • Put all of your belongings on the floor.
  • Do not bother the driver and stay quiet.
  • Tell a trusted grown-up immediately about any unsafe ride.

– See more at: http://www.madd.org/blog/2013/september/child-endangerment-tips.html#sthash.9Icp1jCx.dpuf

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Child Passenger Safety Week

This week is Child Passenger Safety Week, a time to evaluate how to keep our kids safe on the roads.

Child-DD-Graphic

Car crashes are a leading cause of death for children, and too many of those are caused by drunk driving. In 2012, 239 child passengers (under age 15) were killed in drunk driving crashes—representing 20 percent of all child traffic fatalities. And of those, more than half (52 percent) were passengers in a vehicle with the drunk driver.

MADD receives more than 17,000 phone calls every year related to child endangerment. No child should be in danger from drunk driving, especially by those entrusted to keep them safe. Drunk driving is criminal and irresponsible, and driving drunk with a child in the vehicle is a form of child abuse.

While 46 states and the District of Columbia have laws enhancing penalties for those who drive drunk with a child passenger in a vehicle, the laws vary widely in severity and definition of a child passenger. For example, in New York it is a felony to drive drunk with a child passenger under the age of 16, while in Wisconsin, the same offense is a misdemeanor. Click here to see if your state has DUI Child Endangerment Laws.

MADD is urging lawmakers to enact legislation to protect our most vulnerable population, children. Please email your representatives letting them know that you want a stronger DUI child endangerment law in your state and that every child deserves a non-drinking designated driver.

If someone you know is driving drunk with a child in the car, we have more information and strategies available for you here. Or call our toll-free, 24-hour Help Line at 877-MADD-HELP.

– See more at: http://www.madd.org/blog/2014/september/child-passenger-safety-week.html#sthash.21zBddsC.dpuf

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The Power of Parenting

From Maddblog.org
By MADD

students-by-locker

Summer has come to an end, and kids are back at school. But do we parents have the supplies we need to make this a successful school year? No, we’re not talking about backpacks and pencils.We’re talking about the tools every parent needs to keep their kids safe.

Did you know alcohol kills more teens than all other drugs combined? That’s why it is so important to talk with your teens about underage drinking. But we know that this can seem like a daunting task, which is why we created the Power of Parents® program to provide parents with proven tips and tools tohelp your kidsstay alcohol-free this school year.

Here are seven tips for getting through to your teen:

Communicate before a problem starts – Have important discussions now, before there’s blame, anger or punishment. Agree on a time to start talking together about the dangers of alcohol.

Discuss rules and consequences – Explain how you expect your son or daughter to act, and why. Tell your teen plainly that you don’t want him or her drinking. Agree on consequences of broken rules.

Show you care – Gently touch your teen on the arm or back to show affection. Tell your teen you love them and want them to be healthy and safe. Explain that’s why you need to talk together about the dangers of underage drinking.

Pay attention – Even when life gets hectic, take time out to listen to your teen. Monitor where your teen is and what your teen is doing.Share family activities – Have dinner together at least three times a week.

Give and get respect – When your teen talks to you, listen and reply respectfully. Insist that your teen treat you with respect, too.

Enforce consequences consistently – If your teen breaks the rules, stay calm and enforce the consequences.

Click here to get the PDF version of Seven Tips for Connecting with your Teens, as well as helpful conversation starters.

Want to learn more? Get our Parent Handbook for a detailed guide on talking to your teen about alcohol, and our Power of You(th) booklet to help teens take a stand against underage drinking.

– See more at: http://www.madd.org/blog/2014/august/back-to-school.html#sthash.6DaxksqB.dpuf

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